Butterfly

Butterfly: One Dolphin, two kicks

A rookie butterflyer often get confused about the dolphin motion. The butterfly has only one dolphin per arm stroke, but two kicks.  The first kick, is the large kick we see breaking the surface of the water on a proficient butterflyer and help drives us forward. The second, smaller kick is where the beginner often…

Read More

Training Multiple Strokes

Even if you are a triathlete who competes only in freestyle, it is important to train more than one stroke.  Swimming, is the perfect example of a repetitive motion activity.  Even a sprinter, who in general, does fewer overall yards than other freestylers, does thousands of shoulder rotations in their career. It is important to…

Read More

Connect the Dots to Swim Faster

Connection is an important concept for swimming faster, but not often discussed. Simply put connection is all of the motions in a stroke flowing smoothly together to maximize the production and delivery of power to create forward momentum. What does that mean to your stroke? When we develop our stroke mechanics it is common to…

Read More

How to Get Out of a Muscle Memory Rut

Muscle memory allows us to perform complex repetitive motions without thinking about them.   Could you imagine early man trying to hunt if they had to actively think about how to walk?  The mind would be so preoccupied with flexing the ankle, bending the knee, rotating the hip that we would get eaten by the first…

Read More

Swimmer Shoulder

Shoulder impingement syndrome, better known around the pool as swimmer’s shoulder, occurs when the tendons of the rotator cuff muscles become irritated and inflamed as they pass through the subacromial space, the passage beneath the acromion. This can result in pain, weakness and loss of movement at the shoulder. While I cannot use the words always and never when…

Read More

Butterfly, getting the right rhythm

Are you able to do a legal fly but it not smooth or easy? Here are some hints on how to fix your butterfly timing: Two kicks, but only one dolphin. The most common error is trying to do two dolphin kicks. There should be one dolphin and one smaller kick. The dolphin needs to…

Read More

Kicking with Fins

I recently read a nice little article on not feeling guilty for kicking with fins.  It is not that I disagree with the author, he mentioned benefits from making you work harder to fun, to mention just two of his benefits for kicking with fins. It’s just that I feel like I need to pick…

Read More

Hypoxic Training

The term hypoxic is the adjective form of hypoxia which is defined as in adequate oxygen in the blood.  Swimmers have traditionally used hypoxic work in their training when they are limiting their breathing to one breath every three, four, five, six or more strokes. I grew up doing this form of training, as did…

Read More

Butterfly Breathing

On a regular basis I see swimmers of all abilities making two common mistakes when it comes to breathing in butterfly: First, don’t breath everystroke. The amount of effort it takes to lift you head out of the water is significant and exhausting.  I realize swimmers like Michael Phelps sometine breaths everystroke.  I will repeat…

Read More

The much misunderstood “distance per stroke”

Many of you have heard from your coaches, or individual reading, to work on your distance per stroke.  Distance per stroke is generally defined as how far (distance) can you travel on one pull (stroke) or stroke cycle (one pull with each arm).  I’m not disagreeing with my coaching peers, distance per stroke is an…

Read More